Troubleshooting Assignment Designs


As many instructors know, it can be difficult to know how well-developed a writing assignment is, how clearly the prompt is written, and how students will respond to the project, especially when the assignment is brand new.  Soliciting feedback from colleagues, writing specialists, or students can be an effective method of developing prompts, but instructors aren’t always able to take advantage of that opportunity.  Continue reading

The Meaningful Writing Project

Fenwick Library

Developing good writing assignments is a complicated task, one not simplified by the multiple ways in which students sometimes interpret them.  Instructors often find themselves asking: Are my instructions clear?  Do they align with the course’s learning objectives?  And perhaps most important, will my students find this project engaging?  Michelle Eodice, Anne Ellen Geller, and Neal Lerner can’t provide the answers to all of these questions, but their research is helping us to understand what a “meaningful” writing assignment might be for students.  Continue reading

Designing High-Impact Writing Assignments

College of Science

We often think of writing as a tool that prompts deep learning, but we don’t always talk about how to use writing assignments to realize this goal.  That might let us assume that assigning any kind of writing will lead to deep learning, or it might prompt us to wonder if there are particular practices that promote this goal more than others.  According to research by Paul Anderson, Chris Anson, Robert Gonyea, and Charles Paine, the answer is the latter: the quality of the assignment design has a greater impact on learning than the amount of writing students are asked to compose. Fortunately, their research has begun to uncover several high impact practices that instructors can use to design writing assignments across the curriculum. They describe these practices as follows:  Continue reading